Pressemeinungen


Sächsische Zeitung, 03/2008

„Annegret Kuttners Spiel ist von hoher Professionalität und Perfektion, von ansteckender, elektrisierender Musizierfreude und von großer stilistischer Sicherheit in der Interpretation geprägt.“


Irish Times, 07/2007

„Kuttner’s light-fingered playing was impressive for its airy clarity.”


Fanfare Magazin, 12/2008

"This is French Romanticism with large, structurally sound but deceivingly rhapsodic, and it takes very fine players to maintain strength of line while letting the hair down a little in the more florid passages. Peter Bruns and Annegret Kuttner are two such players. Bruns of course is one of the finest cellists in the world….. Kuttner has the flying fingers that move harp-like over the keys while never letting the underlying pulse lose step with the undeniably firm rhythmic impetus. The sound is excellent, with fine local ambiance that lets the instruments sing without seeming to penetrate their personal spaces. This is labeled as Volume 1 of "French Works for Cello and Piano," so we all have a lot to look forward to….."


The New York Sun, 10/2006

"There is no better way to state this than straightforwardly: The rendition of the Third Cello Sonata in A major, Op.69 was a magnificent performance. I have heard Yo-Yo Ma and Emanuel Ax present it - and they made a wonderful recording back in the 1970s - but they were pale shadows compared to these players. This is one the greatest pieces in all of Beethoven, written at the same time as the "Ghost" trio and the Fifth and Sixth symphonies. Just moments into the high main theme of the Allegro ma non tanto, featuring once again that intensely vibrating A string, I knew this was going to be a wild ride. Beyond considerations of pure beauty of sound, the pair did not shy away from fast, challenging tempi, nailing the complex syncopations of the Scherzo with pinpoint accuracy (brava, Ms. Kuttner!)."


allmusic, 12/2008

“Their (Vierne and Widor) works for cello and sonata have not panned out to be cornerstones of the repertoire, however, and a performance of these works would need to be extremely powerful to warrant their inclusion on Volume 1. That is precisely what cellist Peter Brunsand pianist Annegret Kuttner pull off. Their playing is entirely captivating and by the end of the album, one may wonder why these works are not performed more frequently….. The most stunning aspect of the duo's playing is in the delicacy and tenderness of their slow passages, particularly the outer movements of Widor's Suite.
Their almost breathless, whispering playing is sure to keep listeners on the edge of their seats, and keep us waiting with great anticipation for the release of Volume 2.”